Swinging a Blunt Axe

May 28, 2020 3:56 pm

markus-spiske-BjIR85EHWt8-unsplash

“If the axe is blunt, and one doesn’t sharpen the edge, then he must use more strength.” ¹

Without pausing, reflecting and observing, we can easily end up swinging a blunt axe. Maintaining sharp skills and organisational effectiveness warrants constant attention and application, but far too often, we accept things as they are rather than attempting greater effectiveness through a sharper blade.

Here are some examples to reflect on.

  • An accounting firm had lost its edge, having plateaued for 8 years. They took 8 months to sharpen the blade and launched off the plateau to report record growth in subsequent years.
  • Another business, after analysing who its buyers were, sharpened their blade and went more directly to the decision-maker with reported improvement in the following quarter.
  • A supervisor lost his work fulfilment edge over a period of time which started to show in the quality of his management. Once reassigned to a different position he regained his happiness and corresponding sharpness.
  • The 90+ debtors for one company was well out of hand. Sharpening the retrieval blade, we reduced the amount by 97%.
  • A salesperson, disheartened from the realisation they were swinging a blunt sales axe, took a week for reflection and review, found the fail-point, made corrections to their process and went from a 25% to 72% win rate in the following 7 months.

These examples all refer to people gaining insight into their current situations and then responded by the sharpening of their efforts.

In recent times I have had the pleasure of working with a manager who exemplifies a more ahead of the game approach. Recognising an opportunity to sharpen his blade, he requested a rehearsal meeting prior to a sales call with a prospective client.  He wanted to ensure he was swinging a sharp conversational axe. Smart.

A blunt axe equates to increased effort with minimised results whereas a sharp axe reduces required effort but dramatically shifts results and in many cases, almost immediately.

 

 

¹Solomon is generally attributed to writing this around 935 BC

Photo by Markus Spiske

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Slowing Down To Go Fast

November 22, 2018 7:21 pm

Speed Performance

When a business grows, that which once flowed easily can become congested over time—when systems don’t keep up with increased work volumes.

I experienced this first-hand today but in a different setting.

Ten years ago, Kingsford Smith Drive in Brisbane used to be a fast flowing thoroughfare. As the city has grown and the traffic volume has increased so has the congestion. Today, I find the speed reduced to 40 km/h and it’s painfully slow and frustrating at times. Construction crews are now creating new lanes to re-establish speed and flow.

It’s a case of slowing down to speed up.

In business, sometimes it’s critically important to intentionally slow things down temporarily, minimally lowering performance outcomes if required in order to focus our efforts on constructing a new road.

These new roads can represent the employment of new staff; the reorganisation of divisions, management, roles and responsibilities; the documenting of processes and procedures; implementation of a new job management software platform; culture change and so forth.

This kind of decision, to intentionally take a hit on performance and speed, takes courage, but in the long run, congestion will ease, flow will resume, speed and outcomes will rapidly increase and your employees and customers will be significantly better off for it.

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Learning From The Masters

October 12, 2018 10:46 am

Learning

Some years ago I realised that the Masters all had one thing in common; they were learners. They didn’t get to mastery level overnight, but through constant learning and practice, they became experts of their craft.

Many people stopped learning years ago and simply now, go about their days and work relying on this prior knowledge whereas others are constantly engaged in the learning process. They’re expanding their minds, their intuition and skills on a continual basis, causing them to progress faster and higher and making them objects of interest—those to be admired and followed.

Here are some thoughts that I have found useful in my own learning journey.

1. What to learn

Many studies have indicated that successful people build on their strengths and employ or outsource their weaknesses. Skills development around our natural talents and strengths is essential for mastery in any area. It is vital to look at where we want to be, where we are now, which then highlights the learning gap clarifying the what in our development journey.

2. How to learn

There is no right or wrong way to learn, but I think there is a best way for each of us. For some, it is the informal just in time learning. You might face an issue in your work but are unsure how to approach it. Locating the relevant resources, immersing yourself in them and then practising your learning insights is a great way of making your knowledge stick.

Others prefer formal education and this is particularly useful both from the perspective of connecting the dots around your prior learning and providing a broader framework to operate from within; also from the standpoint of gaining qualifications to provide future options. Formal education for some, can be useful where the discipline to self-learn is lacking.

3. Learning Integration

Knowing the theory is one thing; having the ability to integrate this into your daily life and career is quite another. Having an education plan along with an accountability partner helps fast-track this integration and then it’s a case of practice, practice, practice with the cyclical learning process being: Learn, Practice, Succeed/Fail, Rinse and repeat.

While not everyone hits elite mastery levels, all of us can become proficient in certain areas and enjoy the rich personal sense of accomplishment that comes with the learning process.

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Brilliant at the Basics

May 9, 2018 6:54 am

Not The Best Referral

If we invest in front-end marketing but neglect the basics of quality and quick turn-around times, we effectively shoot ourselves in the foot. Even the most basic form of respect in acknowledging someone’s call or email quickly is largely neglected these days.

The basics will always be with us so it’s worth becoming brilliant at them.

 

 

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The Fruit Platter. When Little Things Are Big Things

March 14, 2018 5:47 am

Fruit platter

A few years back, I stayed regularly in the same 5-star hotel on one of my travels. Everything about the place appeared to hum with efficiency. From concierge to the front desk personnel to the cleaning staff – all were pleasant and always willing to assist. Check-in was quick as was checking-out, with an express envelope arriving under my door on the day of departure to get me out of the place quickly. This I expect from a 5-star establishment.

However, I had noticed repeatedly that the process of meeting my preferences was largely neglected. My simple requests for a morning paper left at my door and a fruit platter on my arrival had not been attended to. I always had to ask for the wireless password and was only made aware of the business assistance available on my last visit, which ideally should have been outlined on my initial stay 12 months prior.

While they scored 10 out of 10 in most areas of service, they failed on the small things – those little things that can be really big things to a customer.

What was interesting, is that when I questioned them about my preferences being constantly over-looked, the check-in staff responded that when they get busy they forget to follow through. Surprising though how the bill always arrived, even when at capacity!

For your business, it’s the little things that matter to the customer – the sense of individual care one receives when dealing with your company.  They expect speed and efficiency, these are standard expectations. The small things, on the other hand, can make all the difference in the world, creating repeat customers and word of mouth referrals. These are the some of the feel-good emotional factors that come from interacting with you.

When considering your organisation, create a list of what customers expect, such as quick response to calls and emails, professional service and presentation, expert technical advice etc. Then make a list of what they don’t expect. The little things that would be big things. And often, it’s the little things that set you apart from your competition.

Your invoice won’t necessarily bring them back a second time but the fruit platter just might.

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Timely Reminders

March 6, 2018 5:31 pm

As I fly back to Melbourne tonight after an enriching and busy time away, I thought I’d document some significant timely reminders that came from observations and conversations with quality individuals – both at a business and personal level.

  • Doing short term urgent work is needful when required. Always delaying long-term important work because of the urgent defers solid future growth and profitability.
  • If you are not pushing ahead but merely resting on your past successes, first comes the plateau then the erosion of such.
  • Quality employees like to feel they are making a difference and need to grow and be challenged in their work. If this is absent in their role, they have a higher chance of becoming permanently absent from your organisation.
  • One cause of poor cash flow is not invoicing immediately after job completion.
  • It’s important to expect much from our staff while looking out for them and encouraging them in the process.
  • We tend to undervalue and undercharge for our expertise.
  • The most ‘loyal’ employees could be ripping us off. Allow trust to sit at its highest point of 99%. The remaining 1% is our allowance for the fact that they are human.
  • The stories we tell ourselves about actual events can sometimes be fictional stories.
  • People who feel insecure, inferior and powerless in themselves often promote themselves by various means to feel superior and powerful, compensating for their inner lack. Secure and Powerful people, on the other hand, are sometimes the quietest people in the room.
  • Some of the most courageous people:
    • seek professional help when needed;
    • exercise vulnerability and honesty in their conversations with trusted others;
    • face and deal with their inner demons;
    • continue pushing out of their comfort zones;
    • demonstrate teachability;
    • try new ways and approaches;
    • might stumble and fall badly but always get up no matter how bloodied or bruised from the battle.
  • The more one can systemise their business processes and get the right people in the right roles, the faster one can manage and grow their organisation with greater focus, intent and momentum.
  • Transitions can be daunting times. Extending grace to either ourselves or others in these times assist the transitioner to move forward with greater ease.
  • Two great words in sales are “tell me….”
    E.g. tell me about your greatest challenges, your highest priorities, what these delays are costing you.
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Employees: A Reflection Of Management

February 6, 2018 5:58 am

Grapes

I visited the Curlewis Winery on the Bellarine Peninsula this past weekend in Victoria. Their wine was the definite go back for more variety. As I drove into the property I could see immediately the high care that was given to the vines. Their website says that the owner “wraps each cordon himself by hand in a process that takes up to three months. This hands-on, detailed approach is applied to every step of growing, nurturing, protecting and eventually picking the fruit.”

And as for the vine so for our people.

Talking to an employee recently they said, “I have learned to just do my job – nothing more, nothing less.” Digging a little deeper it was obvious that this was a case of diminished care of the vine by management resulted in lacklustre fruit.

I have met and worked with other team members over my time who are constantly improving, taking ownership of their roles, attempting new things, suggesting better ways of operating to their managers and so forth. When I see these employees in action  (and particularly a team made up of these types) I don’t have to look far to see that the leader is one that nurtures his vines (people) for greatness.

If you desire to increase both the quality and yield of your organisation, don’t forget that the vines need attention. Take care of them and they will take care of you.

 

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Let It Go

September 5, 2017 6:56 pm

 

Edited  Video Transcript
“80% out the door is better than 100% in the drawer.”
Some wise advice I was given many years ago.
One of the things I have realised through life is our penchant for perfectionism and it’s a curse. There is no destination if we live on Perfection Drive – it is one large roundabout.
We strive to have everything perfect, and if it’s not perfect it doesn’t see the light of day. Our in trays are full – good intentions but they’re full because nothing’s quite perfect. We’ve got proposals and quotes, invoices and draft emails that have to be double checked and triple checked before letting them go, creating bottlenecks in our organisations. We have new ideas for business development but because they are not fully formed to perfection we continue with what we’ve always done. We fail to trust others because “no one can do it as good as me.”
Some have got songs that are sitting in the drawer that are at 95% that never see the light of day. Artists – their paintings never see the light of day because they’re not perfect.
Some things need to be given the 100% treatment. Workplace Health and Safety is one that has serious ramifications if we fall short of the mark but much of our output can be let go at less than perfect. The time it takes to perfect something compared to the value received by others doesn’t necessarily correlate.
One of the things I’ve learnt over time is to continually produce, and if it’s 80% or over in my estimation I let it go and I perfect along the way. Does that mean that we shouldn’t strive for excellence? Not at all. Excellence is a great goal, perfectionism, as I said, is a curse.
So in your life, in your work, in your artistic endeavours, in the gifts that you’ve got to share with the world, 80% out the door is a whole lot better than 100% in the drawer.
And it’s up to us to understand what needs to be at 100% and what can be released above 80%. It’s different for everyone and different for every organisation.
Simply said…Let it go.


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Growth Spurts: The Osgood-Schlatter Disease of Business

July 11, 2017 5:58 pm

Businessman bending the knee in front of Doillar currency symbol.I recall being in my early teens and having to cease playing football due to falling prey to the Osgood-Schlatter Disease – a disease that often occurs from growth spurts when muscles, bones and tendons are experiencing a rapidity of change. Pulling back from strenuous activity, rest and exercise were the measures I had to put in place at the time for my body to cope with the growth.

I meet with many business owners and managers who are experiencing growth spurts in their organisations. A constant stream of work and its correlated demands pour in the front end pushing their revenues/sales up significantly. They take on more work and as a result have to feed that front end demand with extra people, plant and equipment and so forth. While these are exciting phases to be in, the growing pains can be significant and I have seen firsthand the effects that some these periods cause. Some of these have been:

  • Disgruntled customers
  • Unhappy staff who are stretched to breaking point
  • Personal exhaustion of the business owner
  • Cashflow being smashed
  • Running well behind schedule
  • Going into liquidation

My recommendation is that if you are in a growth phase or know one is potentially on the horizon, that you give equal attention in your planning to both the front end and back end. While you resource the front end growth, give strong consideration to what is required to support that growth – people, managerial processes, systems, cashflow management, your own personal rest requirements etc.

My personal growth pains in my knees couldn’t be planned for but business is different. It’s much better to take a small hit on profit to resource the back end than to boost sales and go out of business altogether.

 

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Self Awareness, Lifestyle Design and Career/ Leadership Connectivity

May 18, 2017 5:18 pm

   Self Awareness – Lifestyle Design – Career, Leadership Effectiveness

The above graphic demonstrates the connection between:

  • one’s self and the related personal growth
  • the design of, and living out a satisfying and meaningful personal life
  • a career that is aligned with who we are at the core with enhanced Leadership effectiveness.

Connection and Authenticity are central to the process.

Self-awareness is about connection. As I grow in my understanding of who I am, my likes and dislikes, strengths and weaknesses, my gifts and talents, behaviors, personality and so forth, it connects me emotionally and pragmatically to who I am. I am self-connected and in this awareness, I am better able to connect with others.

Authenticity is a life lived congruent to our growing self-awareness. When I understand who I am, I am better equipped to not subject myself to the shoulds and expectations of others. I live a life that is increasingly congruent and authentic in all areas.

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Virgin Airlines – When A Gift Outweighs A Mistake

June 18, 2015 5:52 am

On a flight yesterday from Perth to Melbourne I requested headphones from two separate attendants. Both forgot. I fell asleep, missed my meal and then requested it upon waking – again forgotten.

One of the attendants who I had requested the headphones from saw me and profusely apologised for the neglect, stated a legitimate reason why she and the other girl had forgotten and promptly brought me the headphones. Five minutes later a complimentary cheese platter arrived.

We all make mistakes. That’s part of being human. But the larger mistake is when we try and cover up errors with excuses and do nothing to compensate.

Virgin Airlines get it right 99% of the time. This was the other 1% – a genuine human error. The authentic apology and the compensatory gift restored the disappointment.

We would do well to do the same in our businesses.

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The Shadow of the Shoulds

May 4, 2015 10:28 pm

“I should do this.”

“I ought to do that.”

“I need to be better.”

“What will they think?”

“I’m a failure.”

We are too often driven by the external voices of the shoulds. Others expectations, examples set by role models, obligations. Then, if we are the perfectionist type, we never quite get there and beat the crap out of ourselves through negative self talk. Ever striving – never making it.

On the other hand, running free – motivated from within not from without is a genuinely free place to live.

One allows us the freedom to try and fail, ever increasing in our progress. The other binds us up; hinders advancement and creates unease and unhappiness. One is about self motivation – living intrinsically out of who we are. The other is living to others expectations which can include the perfectionist within.

Much better to run in the clear light of day than in the shadows of the shoulds.

 

 

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Life Lessons From The Vineyard

April 7, 2015 1:23 am

A visit to Adrian Tobin’s Ballandean Winery on the weekend reminded me of the old adage less is more. As Adrian passionately spoke of his quest to create world class wines he mentioned the importance of cutting off the excess bunches to reduce the yield in order to enhance quality.

As I was tasting the wine I reflected on how we, like a vine, end up with excess in our lives -how thinly we spread ourselves in the business of life. We have a plethora of life bunches to attend to, from family demands, work demands, social events, entrepreneurial initiatives and the like. And then, if that’s not enough we fill our remaining time with that ubiquitous technology that is meant to make life easier.

What are the bunches you need to cut off your life vine in order to promote quality – in your work, relationships, goals and ambitions? What do you want to do? Who do you want to be? Where do you want to go? Identify what you want then reduce or discard everything that doesn’t contribute. That way, you stand a great chance of being world class.

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Perfect Stagnation

March 26, 2015 10:45 pm

Attending my second ever Salsa dance lesson last night I got caught up in wanting to perfect the dance. Instead of taking the basics and getting straight out on the floor to practise, I was unsure, slightly afraid and ….stagnate on the sidelines. My dance instructor last year repeatedly told me “you think too much.” I was caught in the perfection trap. So, last night after a bit of deliberation I made the decision to get out there, make lots of mistakes (which I did) but slowly started to get the steps and …. I had fun.

Someone said “80% out the door is better than 100% in the draw.” My mentor from the US  Alan Weiss often says “It’s about success not perfection.”

What I have found in business as well as in other pursuits is that practice does indeed make perfect. If you say “I am hopeless at marketing” then guess what, you will be. But if on the other hand you know you can at least talk to people then start by opening your mouth, communicate how great your team is, your products and services are, your work quality and so forth. Then, perfect along the way.

Starting with what you’ve got, which might be as simple as a few sentences  in the marketing example above, or in my case a few basic steps – is enough to get anyone going. Take what you know out onto the floor and practice.  That way you won’t be standing at the bar stagnating in your quest for perfection whilst watching everyone else have fun and succeeding.

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High Workplace Engagement

March 10, 2015 1:33 am

I have finished an article on Workplace engagement and thought I’d share some thoughts here for business owners and managers on how to create a culture where engagement can thrive.

  • Make the environment a fun and enjoyable place to be
  • Recognise and reward staff achievement
  • Set the performance bar high and work with your people for the achievement of such
  • Create an advancement path providing training opportunities, stretch targets, small project responsibility – assisting them to be all that they can be
  • Listen to your employees asking for their improvement suggestions and actioning as appropriate
  • Take an active interest in your people seeking to understand their internal drivers and motivators and working with them accordingly
  • Express how much you value their contribution
  • Conduct performance reviews on a regular basis. I would suggest quarterly. These need to be mutually involved discussions and even held over lunch for key people
  • If you incentivise, try to tailor it to the individuals internal motivators or to team performance
  • Get consistency in team meetings sharing your vision, company values and goals
  • Lead with transparency, openness and honesty
  • Eat together. This is both one of my observations in my consulting work and also one of the factors in the Australian Workplace Awards. Those who engage in social activities particularly around food tend to demonstrate higher engagement than those who don’t.
  • Provide some level of autonomy for workers with other benefits beside financial considerations. These might be the opportunity to work from home a couple of days a week, moving toward performance based work practices as opposed to purely time based, flexible hours etc.
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What Song Are You Playing?

February 25, 2015 9:42 pm

I happened to be staying in a hotel a few weeks back near the parade start for the Giants Street Theatre performance in Perth. As they moved from the park to the street an accompanying band was playing a tune on the following flat bed truck. Ever since that day, the tune comes back into my head two to three times a week, reminding me of the event. The melodic hook in the song, hooked me.

What song is your business playing? What is the tune that lodges in the head of your customers and prospects? Is it one that evokes pleasant memories of customer service, quality products, workmanship and service – so much so that they will return for future business and tell their friends? Or is it simply a banal tune with no distinction, no hook?

Front of mind is better than out of mind. Which song are you playing?

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Monday Morning Fog

February 1, 2015 1:45 am

Arriving at your desk on Monday morning you check your calendar for the weeks agenda. You look at the accruing paperwork spread across your desk and decide very quickly its coffee time. A few ‘quick chats’ to work colleagues (who are very happy to chat by the way), a wander through the days paper, you then attempt to settle in at your desk. Emails to respond to, a back up of phone messages to return, the customer complaint you procrastinated on last week and so it goes. A foggy Monday morning. Little clarity, a slow start, pessimistic gloominess.

The owner and managers of the business next door, arrived fifteen minutes earlier. Each had a brief weekend catch up as they got coffee and headed straight to their desks. All that was waiting for them was the first action item on their days agenda – the first of many purely focused on making this months performance goals. For this company it is mandatory that everyone spend the last couple of hours on Friday planning the week ahead, returning all calls and emails and clearing their desks. For them, Monday morning is all about activity that counts, optimistic clarity, jumping quickly onto last weeks momentum and starting the week fast.

Welcome to Monday. Foggy or clear skies? The forecast was written on Friday afternoon.

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Happy New Year

January 6, 2015 6:59 am

Happy New Year!

The changeover period tends to lend itself quite naturally to looking ahead, thinking, creating plans and then pushing the action buttons. In my recent newsletter I have written about optimism balanced by realism. I find that the two are perfect partners when it comes to business growth. Facing and then countering market conditions, changing economics, increased competition, challenging staff, low cash flow and the like yet holding an unremitting optimism is one of the things that sets the resilient and successful apart.

I wish you all the best for the year ahead.

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What Are You Sitting On?

November 30, 2014 11:40 pm

A public speaker requests the audience to look underneath their chairs. One lucky attendee finds placed there a gift.

Business is like that.

In our attempts to drive new business we expend countless funds and effort on creating well laid out plans – hiring marketing strategists, social media experts, web SEO specialists and the like.

One of the things we neglect (and often this is due to the effort involved) is the hundreds and perhaps thousands of customers, prospects and unfulfilled quotations that have built up over the years but have never been utilised and are sitting right underneath us. The simple process of gathering  their contact details from business cards, quotations, various lists etc. can be an extremely valuable process. Judiciously collating this data into highest potential leads and then creating a strategy designed to connect with these can turn a business around fast, getting get cash in the door a lot quicker than taking months to make a plan and then market indirectly – such as social media.

While all these strategies have their place, going directly to those who you have dealt with in the past is one of the best ways I know of and that many of my clients have experienced significant results in.

What’s under your chair? Take a look. You might be presently surprised.

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From The Ground Up

September 1, 2014 11:18 pm

Mowing a lawn that had not been cared for in a long time, I discovered under the semi green surface very dry and old grass. The exterior hiding that which lay underneath.

The business of life is like that.

Companies often grow to a point that while seemingly successful to the outsider, chaos, turf battles, financial mismanagement, unethical behaviours and the like lay hidden under the surface. Entrepreneurs with a lightening rise to wealth and fame occasionally come undone. National acclamation with personal failure
The apparently successful family man is found to have a dark private world, undoing what he has built over many years

When I care for a lawn, I will occasionally ‘cut the guts out of it’ – stripping it back to almost bare earth. Then, fertilisers, weed deterrents and water are applied as required. This promotes holistic growth.

Whether it is our business or personal worlds, promoting consistency and growth from the ground up is important if we are to endure for the long haul.

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Front Of Mind or Out Of Mind

July 29, 2014 10:27 pm

I have long held the belief that those who, on a monthly basis, keep in touch with their key prospects and customers are in the top percentile of their industry. At a recent speaking engagement to 70 electricians I asked the question “how many of you keep in touch with your key prospects and customers at least monthly either by calling, monthly newsletter etc?” It was worse than my prediction. No hands went up.

So…if you keep in touch with your key customers and prospects at least once a month, not only will you be in the top one percent of those who do so, you will be the one they call when they need your services.
You want to be front of mind – not out of mind.

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The Expected and Unexpected

July 14, 2014 7:27 am

I recently found some notes I had taken on a visit to The Castle Inn Hotel in Rhode Island – USA. Here are my notations…

  • Arrived – car door opened by concierge (expected)
  • Luggage carried to reception (expected)
  • Asked if I would like coffee while I waited for the room (unexpected)
  • Given a welcome pack that also included weather forecast for next 3 days (unexpected)
  • Personally shown to my room (unexpected)
  • Given a personal tour of my room and how to use appliances, fireplace etc. (unexpected)
  • Lunch – personal service, great food and wine (expected)
  • Made something to my liking that wasn’t on the menu (unexpected)
  • Arrived back to my room after dinner to find chocolates and a robe laid out on my bed (unexpected); Bed was prepared for sleeping (unexpected); Radio playing classical music with mood lighting set (unexpected); Weather forecast note also laid on my bed (unexpected)

What if all businesses took some time to provide the unexpected. I’d expect customers would keep coming back, just like I will return to the Castle Inn

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Leadership not Location

July 10, 2014 6:24 am

Success is about leadership not location. On one occasion, I consulted with two similar types of business in the same town on the same street. One was doing well, the other was not. Leadership was the key differentiator. While successful businesses are led by different behavioural and personality styles (e.g. some introverted, some extroverted), all leaders I’ve encountered generally exhibit the following traits:

  • Most are humble and teachable, yet determined. They are willing to be wrong but determined to get it right. They are humble enough to accept input from management, employees, consultants, accountants, mentors etc.
  • Visionary. They ‘see’ and create the future
  • Leaders not followers. They are the captain of the ship and everyone in the organisation knows it. They don’t fall prey to the whims and whines of customers and employees.
  • They recruit their weaknesses building strong teams around them. 
  • They hold people accountable for results
  • Display a strong sense of self belief
  • Exhibit a strong abundance mentality around future work, money, people etc

Successful companies are led by good leaders period. They do not blame the winds of change always looking within themselves rather than out. If you run a coffee shop ten miles out of town on a road that no one travels down then yes, location might be an issue but in the majority of cases, leadership not location is the success factor

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Efficiency tip #4

April 22, 2014 12:28 am

Work on responding to all email within 24 hours.
Return phone calls within 3 hours where possible.
When providing a quote, advise when they will receive it.
Our current culture expects speed efficiency, undertakings to be kept with constant communication. Rapid turnaround times create increased business.

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Focus Forward

November 23, 2013 8:27 pm

My dance teacher reminded me yesterday to not beat myself up about the last mistake. “Don’t live in the last step, focus on the next one.” And as Tiger Woods is often quoted as saying, “I hit it and forget it. You can’t go back in time and replay a shot, so just forget about it and move on.”

The next step; next shot; next meeting; next sale; next presentation. Whatever your ‘next’ is, focus forward.

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